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The Best English Reading Paragraphs. Part – 20

  1. Engaging in English reading paragraphs is essential for language development and comprehension skills.
  2. Improving English comprehension paragraphs helps individuals grasp complex ideas and enhances their overall understanding of the language.
  3. Diverse reading comprehension passages offer varied content, enabling readers to explore different topics and expand their knowledge.
  4. Practice with a specific paragraph for reading practice contributes to honing one’s ability to extract information efficiently.
  5. Regular exposure to reading comprehension paragraphs is vital for academic and professional success, fostering critical thinking and analytical skills.
  6. The importance of reading paragraph lies in its role as a fundamental building block for effective communication and information processing.
  7. Consistent reading paragraph practice is recommended for those aiming to enhance their reading speed and comprehension accuracy.
  8. For individuals preparing for language proficiency exams like IELTS, mastering IELTS reading paragraphs is crucial for success.
  9. Reading a paragraph in English daily is a simple yet effective habit to develop and maintain language proficiency.
  10. Emphasizing the importance of reading paragraph in educational settings contributes to a well-rounded academic experience.
  11. The cumulative effect of dedicated practice with english reading paragraphs results in improved language skills and a broader intellectual horizon.
Health and climate scientists have mapped how climate change affects different parts of the world in different ways.  The scientists point to evidence that changes in the past thirty years may already be affecting human health.  Possible effects include more deaths from extreme heat or cold, from storms and from dry periods that lead to crop failures.
Temperature changes may also influence the spread of disease.  For example, warmer weather speeds the growth of organisms that cause diseases like malaria and dengue fever.
The work by scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the World Health Organization appeared in the journal Nature.  The W.H.O. is a United Nations agency.
The agency recently estimated that climate changes caused by human activity lead to more than one hundred fifty thousand deaths each year.  Cases of sickness are estimated at five million.  And the W.H.O. says the numbers could rise sharply by two thousand thirty.
Jonathan Patz of the Gaylord Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at Wisconsin led the study.  Professor Patz notes that climate scientists linked global warming to the heat that killed thousands in Europe in August of two thousand three.  But he says poor countries least responsible for the warming are most at risk from the health effects of higher temperatures.
Professor Patz says areas at greatest risk include southern and eastern Africa and coastlines along the Pacific and Indian oceans.  Also, large cities experience what scientists call a “heat island” effect that can intensify conditions.
Professor Patz says average temperatures worldwide have increased about one-third of a degree Celsius in the last thirty years.  But he tells us even that can make a difference with a disease like malaria.  The report says average temperatures could increase as much as six degrees Celsius by the end of the century.
Professor Patz says the world faces an important moral test.
Representatives from about two hundred nations have been meeting in Montreal, Canada, to discuss climate change.  The ten-day conference ends December ninth.  It is the first such United Nations meeting since the Kyoto Protocol took effect earlier this year.  The treaty seeks to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide and other heat-trapping gases released as pollution into the air.

VOCABULARY

WordSynonymsAntonymsMeaningExample
Climate scientistsEnvironmental researchers, Weather expertsClimate change deniersExperts who study the long-term patterns of temperature, humidity, wind, and precipitation in a particular areaThe work by climate scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the World Health Organization appeared in the journal Nature.
Climate changeGlobal warming, Environmental changeClimate stabilityLong-term changes in the Earth’s climate, including variations in temperature and weather patternsHealth and climate scientists have mapped how climate change affects different parts of the world in different ways.
ExtremeIntense, SevereModerate, MildReaching a high or the highest degree, beyond what is considered normal or usualPossible effects of climate change include more deaths from extreme heat, cold, storms, and crop failures.
Temperature changesFluctuations in temperature, Shifts in heat levelsTemperature stabilityVariations or alterations in the degree of heat or coldTemperature changes may influence the spread of diseases such as malaria and dengue fever.
SpreadDissemination, PropagationContraction, CompressionThe act of extending over a wide area or increasing in extentWarmer weather speeds the growth of organisms that cause diseases, influencing their spread.
DiseaseIllness, SicknessHealth, WellnessA particular abnormal condition that negatively affects the structure or function of part or all of an organismWarmer weather may lead to the spread of diseases like malaria and dengue fever.
Crop failureHarvest loss, Agricultural setbackBumper crop, Abundant harvestThe inability to produce a successful crop, resulting in a reduced or nonexistent yieldDry periods caused by climate change may lead to crop failures.
OrganismsLiving beings, Life formsInanimate objects, Non-livingAny living thing, such as plants, animals, and microorganismsWarmer weather speeds the growth of organisms that cause diseases like malaria and dengue fever.
Global warmingClimate change, Rise in average temperaturesGlobal coolingAn increase in the Earth’s average surface temperature caused by the buildup of greenhouse gasesClimate scientists linked global warming to the heatwave that killed thousands in Europe in August 2003.
Health effectsMedical consequences, Impact on well-beingHealth benefitsChanges or outcomes related to the physical or mental well-being of individualsPoor countries least responsible for global warming are most at risk from the health effects of higher temperatures.
Average temperaturesMean heat levels, Typical temperatureExtreme temperaturesThe measure of the overall level of heat or cold in a specific areaAverage temperatures worldwide have increased about one-third of a degree Celsius in the last thirty years.
MalariaMosquito-borne disease, Plasmodium infectionWellness, Disease-freeA life-threatening disease caused by parasites transmitted to humans through the bites of infected mosquitoesEven a small increase in average temperatures can make a difference with a disease like malaria.
Heat island effectUrban heat island, Urban warmingCooling effectThe increased temperature in urban areas compared to their rural surroundingsLarge cities experience a “heat island” effect that can intensify conditions.
Moral testEthical challenge, Test of principlesImmoral action, Ethical lapseA situation that requires individuals to make decisions based on ethical principlesProfessor Patz states that the world faces an important moral test in addressing the health effects of climate change.
United NationsU.N., International organization, World bodyNational government, SovereigntyAn intergovernmental organization that promotes international cooperation and peaceRepresentatives from about two hundred nations have been meeting at the United Nations conference in Montreal to discuss climate change.
Kyoto ProtocolInternational agreement, Climate treatyClimate denial, OppositionAn international treaty aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions to combat climate changeThe Montreal conference is the first United Nations meeting since the Kyoto Protocol took effect earlier this year.
Carbon dioxideCO2, Greenhouse gas, Carbon emissionsOxygen, Clean airA colorless, odorless gas produced by the burning of fossil fuels, deforestation, and other human activitiesThe Kyoto Protocol seeks to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide and other heat-trapping gases released into the air.

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